Does Working in an Office Negatively Affect Your Skin?

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Table of Contents

Neck pain or tech pain

What can help

Stress

  • More oiliness and breakouts
  • Premature aging such as fine lines and wrinkles
  • Eye bags and under eye circles
  • Redness and irritation
  • Dullness and dehydration

What can help

Poor or reduced circulation

What can help

Dryness

What can help

Book a consultation with cutis

One main disadvantage of working outdoors is the constant exposure to UV rays and pollution that can damage and age the skin. But does it mean that having a desk or office job is always better for your complexion and frees you up from any type of skin damage? 

Working in an Office How it Affects Your Skin

Continue reading as we share the ways your office work could be harming your skin and what you can do about it.

Neck pain or tech pain

Our heavy reliance on electronic devices and technology has caused many of us to constantly crane our heads or necks when looking down at a screen. This results in tech neck or chronic neck/shoulder pain caused by repetitive strain while looking down at a computer screen or phone.    

Tech neck doesn’t only cause discomfort that can affect your productivity, but it can also harm your skin. Poor posture and increased strain when looking down at devices are said to speed up aging on the neck skin, causing prominent creases over time. Tech neck, furthermore, can be related to premature aging such as neck lines and wrinkles.

What can help: One thing you can do is to raise your monitor, so that the top of your screen is at or slightly below eye level. You can use a laptop stand or a stack of books if you work on a computer monitor. Using a neck serum like Dr. Sylvia’s 24k Gold Neck Protect can also help reduce visible signs of aging and improve dry and dull skin.

Stress

Work-related stress is not uncommon in many jobs, especially those that rely on strict schedules or tight deadlines. Stress may also come from dealing with office politics, communicating with coworkers, as well as commuting to and from the workplace. If not managed, stress can lead to physical symptoms and skin issues, including:

  • More oiliness and breakouts – rising cortisol (stress hormone) levels increase sebum production which can clog the pores. 
  • Premature aging such as fine lines and wrinkles – excess cortisol breaks down collagen and elastin.
  • Eye bags and under eye circles – worrying about the things that are making you stressed can make it harder for you to fall or stay asleep. 
  • Redness and irritation – stress hormones prompt an immune response that can make the skin more sensitive and exacerbate existing skin conditions.
  • Dullness and dehydration – this can be due to falling back into unhealthy habits (poor diet, less sleep) due to stress and anxiety.

What can help: The best thing you can do is to manage your stress. Strategies that can help include breathing exercises, yoga, meditation, and going out with friends. You can also consider aesthetic treatments such as HydraMaster to cleanse, hydrate, and nourish your skin, laser skin rejuvenation to revitalize and restore your skin tone, or VYC-12, a skin booster that nourishes the skin from the inside out.

Poor or reduced circulation

Sitting for extended periods of time negatively affects circulation, causing it to slow down, with the blood mostly remaining in the lower extremities. It is also worth noting that reduced circulation impacts the supply of oxygen and nutrients throughout the body. The effects can show up on your skin, resulting in a dull and tired-looking complexion. 

What can help: Getting around or taking breaks from sitting can help a lot. If possible, you can take more trips to the water cooler, walk during your lunch break, or take phone calls while standing. Other ways to incorporate physical activity into your day include:

  • Using the stairs instead of lifts or elevators.
  • Walk or cycle to work if possible.
  • Have your lunch break away from your desk. 

For further reading: Break Free from Sitting: How to Fight a Sedentary Lifestyle

Dryness

Some office spaces have dry air that can increase your risk of getting sick or annoying skin issues. Blasting the air conditioner can reduce the moisture in the air, which can then contribute to dry skin and exacerbate eczema symptoms. Dry air, furthermore, can compromise the skin’s barrier function, making it more susceptible to damage. 

What can help: Using a humidifier can add moisture to the air and possibly prevent dry skin. You can also protect your skin by making sure you use a face moisturizer in the morning and evening. You may also use a moisturizer or a hydrating face mist to soothe and hydrate your skin, especially when it feels dry.

Book a consultation with Cutis

You cannot completely avoid these effects, but you can always prioritize skincare, so you can better protect your skin. If you need help in doing that or boosting your efforts, don’t hesitate to reach out to Cutis Medical Laser Clinics in Singapore. Schedule a consultation with our aesthetic doctor to find out how we can help solve your skin woes and achieve your skin goals.





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